Chris Randall: Musician, Writer, User Interface Designer, Inventor, Photographer, Complainer. Not necessarily in that order.
 

Tags: Creative Spice


February 9, 2017

Sync 02...

by Chris Randall
 



Sync02 is the second in what is apparently going to be a yearly 1st-Saturday-Of-March affair. Last year's event went off well enough that we decided to do it again, despite the torential rain. As you may remember if you attended, Sync01 took place at JWZ's excellent CodeWord venue in San Francisco.

My goal is to never do the event in the same place twice, so this year's event is in Portland, on Saturday, March 4th at Holocene. It is over twice as big as last year's, so we got a partner. Audio Damage is doing it in partnership with Control Voltage. The manufacturers that will be exhibiting include:

Audio Damage
Industrial Music Electronics
WMD
Mordax
Pittsburgh Modular
4ms
LZX
Noise Engineering
Make Noise
Malekko
Darkplace
1010 Music
01Synth
Topobrillo
Blue Lantern
Møffenzeef Mødular
AI Synthesis
Intellijel
Roger Linn Design
(more TBA)

Control Voltage will have a pop-up store at the venue, so warm up your debit card. The exhibition runs from 10:30A to 4:30P, and then we close the venue for a bit to remove the tables, and reopen at 5:30P for the show. The performers include:

Baseck
Bana Hafar
Rodent
T2

The exhibition is free to attend, and all-ages. The performance is 21+ and $10. So, if you're in Portland, and you don't come to this, well... I am given to understand that Modular On The Spot will be doing a separate event the night before. The Facebook event page is here. Please hit the little button to let us know you're coming. That number is helpful.

It may be a little early to bring this up, but I'm also open to ideas for where Sync03 should be. It takes a while to put these together, so the city needs to have a good confluence of both manufacturers and customers. My initial first choice for Sync03 was Washington, DC, but I'm also open to European cities, or something I haven't thought of.

 
October 26, 2016

Oscillator Breach...

by Chris Randall
 



As some of you may know, I dropped a new album on Detroit Underground™ two weeks ago. It is unusual for me not to self-release, as has been my habit for the last 15 years or so, but I really like what Detund is doing; they first popped on my radar when they put out Richard Devine's excellent RISP project, and their releases comprise a major percentage (maybe 80%?) of the music I've been listening to since then. Kero has an amazing visual sense, along with his great taste in IDM stylings, and I wanted to be part of that family.

The album consists of six tracks and four remixes (from Baseck, Proem, Qebo, and Corbin Davis.) The six tracks are, as is my way for the last couple years, all Euro and tape loops of found sounds. The Tech Time videos in my Analog Industries YouTube channel accurately describe my methodology for making these tracks, so in lieu of an extended process explanation, you can go watch those. The tracks all start with a stand-alone Euro patch and tape loops, and once I have something that I like, I part them out in to Live, and do the arrangement and post-production there. Once each track was done, I pre-mastered it to my Otari MTR-12 two-track deck, and then dumped it back in to the computer and sent it to Wade Alin at Standard Mastering for the final squish. (The remixes were mastered and level-matched by Detund. Not sure who they used.) These are mastered to what Wade calls "Old Guy Levels," which is to say that they retain most of their dynamics, and are not square waves at 0dBfs. The artwork was done by the amazing Layer-Based Human Activities™ from Athens, Greece.

If you guys have any technical questions or comments about the album, now is the time and this is the place!

 
August 24, 2016

The Weekly No. 006: Milestones...

by Chris Randall
 
 



I didn't realize it until I'd rendered and uploaded the video, but this week's quasi-philosophical meandering actually has a theme, and that theme is "milestones." In the first half, I ramble for a couple minutes about the minor yet not minor at all milestone of crossing 1,000 subs on the AI YouTube channel. I also get confetti in my ears.

In the second half, I wander around the subject of actually finishing songs. As to whether I impart any information that one could consider "useful" is open to interpretation. But whatever I'm doing, I feel like I do it with a great deal of charm, and dare I say enthusiasm?

 
November 26, 2015

Octave Is...

by Chris Randall
 

Listen to the album "009909" by Chris Randall.

For those of you that don't follow me on Twitter, I let it drop the other day that me and the missus and our long-time web collaborator Mark Beeson made a thing.

From the embed above, it should be readily apparent what it does. And long-time readers will know exactly why we made it, so I don't need to go in to any lengthy explanation about that. Suffice it to say that we've been working on it for about a while now, and Octave is now open for business. We're addressing user wishes as they come in, so its purview is adjusting (and rather rapidly, it must be said) to the use cases that we, as professional musicians, need.

Happy to field any questions/comments here. One further thing: in conversation about the service with someone that didn't fully understand the point, I quipped the following: "Soundcloud is for musicians with fans; Octave is for musicians with clients."

 
September 30, 2015

Twitching...

by Chris Randall
 

This article on Engadget caught my eye this morning. The tl;dr version: Deadmau5 is streaming his studio work (and gaming, I guess) on Twitch.

Now, everyone reading this is no doubt familiar with my love of process, and while I don't particularly care about Mr. Zimmerman's process in particular, I like the general idea of sharing your work while you do it. I'm a visual thinker, and I get way more out of watching someone do something than reading an article or instruction manual. The vast majority of my learning comes from watching process videos and talks on YouTube. In point of fact, my favorite YouTube channels are Jimmy Diresta and I Like To Make Stuff, both of which are (while not music related, even a tiny bit) 100% about process.

I don't have any particular problem with people watching me work; in point of fact, the results are generally better because of the audience. (As long as I'm not doing vocals. That's a different story.) My questions about this idea is thus: is this something other people find interesting? I mean, would you sit on your couch for an hour and watch someone patch a Euro system or program beats on Twitch or YouTube Live? I personally don't generally watch music production process videos, because they are (and I am in no way tooting my own horn here; just stating a fact) usually put up by people that are far less experienced than I in electronic music production.

It wouldn't be that much trouble for me to pull this off. I have a commercial broadband connection here you can drive a truck through, and the technical knowledge to provide pretty good video and audio streams. However, I honestly have no idea if it's something you guys would be interested in, and thus worth the trouble.

(It would, however, be an excellent impetus to keep my office clean.)
 

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