May 8, 2007

You know what drives me bananas?

by Chris Randall
 



These little context push ads are really fucking annoying. I can see where they might Increase Shareholder value on a site that's about a more general topic, but when you're looking at a press release for a digital microphone interface (that is, a mic pre for digital mics) chances are you're on a hunt for very specific information, and something like the above link is roughly as important to your daily existence as, say, a link to a hairless cat breeder, and the only way it's gonna get clicked is on accident.


(Now, don't get me wrong. There's nothing wrong with hairless cats. I'm all for 'em, and wouldn't mind having one myself.)


So, that being the case, these ads can't _possibly_ make the site (in this case Harmony Central) any amount of money that makes them worth the bother, and they make the user (in this case me) so aggro that he may stop visiting the site at all. So, word to the wise, meta-site operators: these ads are a Bad Idea. Surely an imaginative person could figure out a way to monetize their site that didn't involve annoying the readers to no end, right?

 
 
 

19 comments:

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May.09.2007 @ 2:50 PM
PBXorcist
"My question is: are people finding new, even more annoying mechanisms for web advertising because web advertising generates revenue; or are people finding new, even more annoying mechanisms for web advertising because web advertising doesn't generate revenue but it's been hyped so hard that people aren't able to give up on it?"

The answer to that question is yes it generates revenue. Specifically the layer ads triggered by keywords work fairly well, as you end up clicking on them when you dont want to, which still brings the site owners revenue. The problem is the number of scraper sites and the gaming of the search system to direct users to "false content" just for the advertising payout.

There are highly targeted ads out there, and the technology for it is only increasing, but the problem for folks like us, is that very niche markets like electronic music, or music production or DJ'ing, dont have enough advertisers or the budgets to utilize that technology, and thus are considered "non premium" and get the punch the monkey stuff.

There are great ways to monitize a site that dont piss off your users, but it usually takes a pretty good knowledge of the advertising landscape and the abilty to handle some sort of level of ad sales.

-PBX

 
 

 
May.09.2007 @ 3:14 PM
Tomer
Well im looking at the solution D and this seems to me exacly like the latest USB microphone craze going on in the last year or so.

If i read currect the preamp circuit is built into the AD stage.
that doesnt seem so revolutionary to me.
so we get mics with more headroom which distort less early ,whats so spacial about that?

 
 

 
May.09.2007 @ 3:29 PM
Chris Randall
I didn't say it was special. I was just curious because I like to be informed about such things and know what the hell other people are talking about. Quite frankly, I'm one of the people that thinks the preamp is just as (if not more) important as the microphone in determining the sound that ultimately gets printed. So I'm not necessarily going to be hip to Neumann's choice. I can see how this would be useful in certain situations; mine is not one of them, though.

As for the advertising, you're right inasmuch as a niche market isn't going to receive the targeted advertising that a less specialized... wait a minute... that's simply not true. Gearslutz charges $400 for 10K impressions in a month, and they do quite well for themselves, on a site that is 100% user-driven content and requires little to no editorial input. Is the bullshit that some uninformed wannabe end-user spouts any more or less useful than what is written in the average prosumer audio press release? I think not. Hyperbole is just that, plain and simple, whether it comes from the company itself or Diamond Dave.

-CR

 
 

 
May.09.2007 @ 4:03 PM
mitchell
re> hairless cats...

Some friends have a couple of rex's (almost totally hairless), and they always smell bad. So you might not want one (and I'm a big fan of cats).

mitchell

 
 

 
May.09.2007 @ 5:11 PM
PBXorcist
"Gearslutz charges $400 for 10K impressions in a month, and they do quite well for themselves, on a site that is 100% user-driven content and requires little to no editorial input."

Right...thats a 0.40 CPM (cost per thousand) which is what just about any decent content site could get from one of the better ad networks out there. But again, thats just a step up from the non premium site really, compared to an industry site that is charging $50-100 CPM.

By targeted advertising I mean more access to some of the higher end and more esoteric technologies like retargeting and behavioral targeting. Thats really one of the better ways to get the right ads to the right people.

But again, most hobbist sites arent really going to get into that sort of thing, nor do they have access to the advertisers who would want to use it.

On the bright side, sooner or later site owners learn that just bulking up on ads doesnt work.

-PBX

 
 

 
May.10.2007 @ 11:03 AM
penzoil washington
Sonicstate doesn't bother me....in fact I've learned some very interesting things there. For annoying, ignorant fucktard weasels, look no further than gearwire (the skinny blond dude).

fwiw, i have a Neuman BCM-105 (i think thats the model) which has, they say, the same capsule as their digital mic. it's ok, not stellar.

 
 

 
May.10.2007 @ 11:43 AM
Trancetones
"Gearslutz charges $400 for 10K impressions in a month, and they do quite well for themselves, on a site that is 100% user-driven content and requires little to no editorial input."
"Right...thats a 0.40 CPM (cost per thousand) which is what just about any decent content site could get from one of the better ad networks out there. But again, thats just a step up from the non premium site really, compared to an industry site that is charging $50-100 CPM."

Actually thats a $40- cpm that Gearslutz is getting.

 
 

 
May.10.2007 @ 2:52 PM
PBXorcist
damnit.

Just say no to doing math, by hand, after cocktails.

-PBX

 
 

 
May.10.2007 @ 3:30 PM
terryrobinson0203
lol, i actually work in online publishing, and our sites carry the vibrant intellitxt things. I totally agree, all of our sites are quite niche and the keywords are so broad that sometimes its just plain stupid. Ive seen some funny matches in my time. I remember publishing an article which was about a small business software toolkit, and the intellitxt had picked up the word "tool", and had linked it to an Ann Summers ad (for the naive among you Ann Summers sell a variety of adult toys, costumes, etc...), i laughed so hard i had bruises.

But sadly they do bring in a fair wedge every month (sometimes can be as much as 10% of our total ad revenue), and considering that we dont sell the ad space I can kinda stomache it.

Although like what has been said before people click on it by accident which boosts the click through rates, so for the advertiser i really do not see them producing any results at all - but these ad agencies have yet to figure that out.

 
 

 
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