October 29, 2006

Alta Moda Unicomp...

by Chris Randall
 




You never know what you're gonna hit upon travelling about the Internets. Case in point, here's a really nice looking compressor I was thus far unaware of (a fact I didn't think was possible, but there you go.) This is the Unicomp, from Australian manufacturers Alta Moda.


It's a dual mono topology, and has some pretty slick features, like the ability to switch between feedback and feed forward, a "warmth" knob to add 2nd-order harmonic distortion, and a "blend" knob, which works (if I'm reading the material right) sort of like a mix, which is something you don't normally see on a comp, but is hugely handy if you're using compressor effects on a drum buss, to perfect (I'm just throwing this out as an example) your "In The Air Tonight" drum sound.


In any case, I don't know the price, but the unit is ostensibly available from TransAudio, although it's not listed on their site, so I don't know that for certain.

 
 
 

20 comments:

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Oct.29.2006 @ 2:33 PM
zelenycaj
Alta Moda unicomp $4,250.00
link [www.lasvegasproio.co...]">link [www.lasvegasproio.co...]
 
 

 
Oct.29.2006 @ 6:35 PM
afreshcupofjoe
What is this, Gearslutz? Bring the synths!
 
 

 
Oct.29.2006 @ 6:43 PM
javahut
I'm drooling over this.

OK... when do we get the Audio Damage plug-in version?

 
 

 
Oct.29.2006 @ 10:08 PM
Jeremy Cox
overpriced
 
 

 
Oct.30.2006 @ 1:43 AM
longneck
thats like some credit debt ive had
 
 

 
Oct.30.2006 @ 12:05 PM
neilium
I think it's a force of nature that any web discussion of audio gear will tilt towards the expensive.

I have to wonder, is there really that much of a market for so many kilobuck compressors? Or is the pro audio world becoming like the guitar market, with the most expensive instruments not being bought by professional musicians but by weekend warriors who are plastic surgeons or lawyers during the week (think Paul Reed Smith, Zemaitas, and Bogner).

 
 

 
Oct.30.2006 @ 12:09 PM
nousrnm
"with the most expensive instruments not being bought by professional musicians but by weekend warriors who are plastic surgeons or lawyers during the week"

BINGO

 
 

 
Oct.30.2006 @ 12:11 PM
Chris Randall
Well, that's an interesting point. However, I think it's the reverse. Only the biggest producers and studios tend to buy stuff like this. As we well know, most "weekend warriors" spend their money on instruments, not studio gear. (Witness the massive quantities of high-end synths running in to Mackie, Behringer, and Roland consoles, with Presonus and M-Audio convertors that I post here on a regular basis.)

Outboard is generally the last thing on most anyone's mind, unless they own a commercial studio venture of some sort, or are a professional producer of rock or R&B.

-CR

 
 

 
Oct.30.2006 @ 12:40 PM
neilium
"Outboard is generally the last thing on most anyone's mind, unless they own a commercial studio venture of some sort, or are a professional producer of rock or R&B."

True that. But such people and places are shrinking in number, if I'm not mistaken. I appreciate the desire to get a better piece of gear to such a market, (and there are people in that market who value the improvements offered) but it seems to me like an uphill battle these days.

Then again, judging by studio websites and ads in Tape Op, the only two things they have to talk about are client lists and gear lists. You can't buy clients, but you can always buy gear.

 
 

 
Oct.30.2006 @ 1:00 PM
Chris Randall
A good gear list goes a long way towards getting new clients, it's worth pointing out. If I'm going to hire a studio, it's got to have the things I like and need to do my production. And the only reason I _would_ hire a studio is if it had the same or better gear than I have at home, which means high-end mic pres and mics, convertors that are Apogee or better, Adam or Barefoot monitors, some good buss and insert comps, and Eventide and Lexicon outboard effects.

Obviously, this doesn't count for bands that need to do a quick demo, or are short on cash. Those are the sort of situations that made the omnipresent "Mackie 8-buss and a pair of ADATs" studios so successful for a healthy chunk of time, and now tend to the ridiculous M-Audio/PT Lite bullshit setup. But for a producer looking for a lockout to do an album, the studio has to have the stuff the producer needs to get his sound.

-CR

 
 

 
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