August 26, 2014

Shitcockery...

by Chris Randall
 



The video above is outstanding. There's no other way to describe it. I'm not a big Goldie fan, being more on the Roni Size side of the fence when it comes to rollers, but the Heritage Orchestra performing Goldie, with that level of musicianship, and the joy the proceedings bring to the table, is a prime example of the Perfect Storm, where everything comes together, and the energy that it gives off is greater than the energy that went in to making it. (And that, in my opinion, is the definition of art, overall.)

I don't really have anything to say about the performance, because it is both objectively and subjectively outstanding. I do have something to say about this, though:



Here's the thing: it is perfectly acceptable to not like something. It's even acceptable to voice that opinion. Music, like anything creative, is a subjective endeavor. But that comment is a prime example of the form of Internet Fuckwittery we've come to learn is a byproduct of making cool shit. The Dunning-Kruger Effect in full force. (The tl;dr version: the Dunning-Kruger effect is a scientific study that proves the old saw that a fool is certain, while a wise man is full of doubt.)

In my various careers, I've run in to this a lot. There's the pedigreed version, in the form of the guy that writes reviews of records and live shows. There's the semi-pro version, where someone has enough knowledge to make music, but not enough to do it well, and becomes a self-taught expert on gear, but not its use. There's the fan version, wherein lyrics that were generally chosen for their ability to fit in to a rhyming scheme become the subject of debate and broad declaratives about an artist's state of mind. There's the Agile version, where stakeholders and user stories substitute for actually having a vision. It goes on and on.

Chris Killer is phrasing his comment in this form: "I am an expert on the live orchestration and performance of 90s drum 'n' bass, and this fellow needs to work at things a little while in order to properly meet my exacting specifications of what, exactly, constitutes same." Chris isn't, however, an expert on anything having to do with this performance. He isn't even a semi-expert. As far as I can tell, the only relationship he might have to this performance is that he bought a Goldie record once.

And there's the rub: it's okay to just say "I don't like this." Leave it at that. "In my opinion, this isn't done the way I like to see Goldie's music done." That's totally fine. Everyone's okay with that. But when you're all "I KNOW EVERYTHING THERE IS TO KNOW ABOUT THIS THING AND YOU DID THIS THING WRONG EVEN THOUGH IT'S YOUR THING AND NOT MY THING" you're running a serious risk of coming off like a fuckwit.
 
 
 

35 comments:

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Sep.08.2014 @ 11:55 AM
Roikat
(Notice how I just Chris Killer'd a whole family of legendary Vikings? I expect trouble in Valhalla ...)
 
 

 
Sep.09.2014 @ 1:45 PM
Chris Randall
If you didn't mea culpa that in the next comment, I wouldn't have even... :-)

-CR
 
 

 
Sep.10.2014 @ 5:24 AM
coyoteous
I'll defer to the learned in such matters on the invention/discovery of dnb, and "stayed discovered" made me laugh a little... but, invented time-stretching?

Come on.

Was CK was referring to the intro with "good start though?"

No matter... thanks for making me listen to, read and think some about stuff I normally wouldn't.

Oh, who's the guy in the hat and sunglasses toward the beginning of the video ("Sgt. Pepper of drum and bass," etc.)?
 
 

 
Sep.11.2014 @ 2:07 AM
kobalt
@coyoteous : James Lavelle
 
 

 
Sep.11.2014 @ 9:53 PM
coyoteous
Thanks, kobalt.
 
 

 
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