November 21, 2005

Here's something you don't see every day...

by Chris Randall
 



It seems that a new company called Bricasti Design is actually releasing a hardware reverb, the M7. It is rather unusual for a hardware 'verb to come from someone besides TC, Lexicon, or Yamaha, so I thought it worth mentioning here. The website has the specs and it looks pretty tasty. Obviously, we're just pissing in the wind until someone actually hears it, but the specs look nice enough. No price yet, but according to them, the first units will be available in January. I'm going to guess around $1500 or more, just from the tooling on the front panel. Perhaps they'll be at NAMM and I can check it out there.


UPDATE:
Apparently, the lead designer of this bad boy is the guy that designed the Lexicon 480L. So the company has some cred. The unit will be $3000+ when it is released, so it better be God's Own Gift to reverb, because I could get two Eventide 2016s for that.

 
 
 

4 comments:

 
 

 
Nov.21.2005 @ 10:45 AM
penzoil washington
Damn, I was decked by their "stunning array of DSP processors", you shoulda warned us. :)

I'll take this in the form of IR's please.

 
 

 
Nov.22.2005 @ 2:52 PM
Suit & Tie Guy
no word clock input.

that's kind of a major design boner.

 
 

 
Nov.25.2005 @ 12:55 PM
synthetic
Word clock would be nice, but if you're going dig in you'll probably go dig out as well. I'm interested to know what the ethernet jack is for.

I wish he would do a version with no analog I/O for less money.

 
 

 
Nov.26.2005 @ 2:43 AM
Det3
Yo STG, there's no word clock input because the digital inputs are self-clocking, meaning that Bricasti probably taps off of the AES input and extracts a word clock from it. Msg me for more info, if you're curious.

Schemes like this usually lock, but are usually susceptible to larger amounts of jitter than a clean word clock being bounced around a studio.

What would REALLY be a design boner is if they used something like a Cirrus Logic or TI sample rate converter then did all of their internal processing at some locked sample rate.

 
 

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