June 9, 2013

Let's Go Ahead And Kill Your Dream Early...

by Chris Randall
 



I typed up a fairly lengthy rant on the current state of Kickstarter that was largely triggered by this article. I think the author, while perhaps not exactly clear on how capitalism works, makes some very good points. Then I realized what I was really building up to was some rather delicious schadenfreude about The Cabin Sisters. All that by way of saying that 00tz 00tz, the band pictured above, shouldn't feel that bad. You're in the same boat as David Mamet's kids. There are worse boats to be in, mostly operated by Carnival Cruise Lines, where you'll apparently be stuck on the Promenade Deck with David Foster Wallace footnoting the experience as he tosses off another cynical rant about people from flyover states that don't buy his books.

Anyhow, I deleted that tirade. Why? Because it's so fucking obvious. Yeah, Kickstarter have demonstrated that they have malleable morals. Yeah, Amanda fucking Palmer. Yeah, Penny Arcade, whatever. Veronica Mars? There's a stretch goal for the people that give a shit. David Mamet? Sorry girls. Sins of the father, and all that jazz. Plus, it helps to be able to play an instrument before you go off making records. And seriously, music video? 1993 called. They want their marketing (and their joke) back.

Also, I don't want people to confuse me with DFW. (I generally expound parenthetically.)

Basically, it comes to this: there was a brief time from the 1970s to the mid 1990s, where being a musician didn't also mean being a panhandler. That time is gone. Which brings me to the actual subject of our conversation: Flattr. Go peruse that site, then come back here and we'll discuss. I'm intrigued with the idea, personally. Interested to hear the thoughts of the AI readership.
 
 
 

46 comments:

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Jun.16.2013 @ 1:06 PM
beauty pill
I'm with boobs.
 
 

 
Jun.18.2013 @ 8:09 PM
puffer
Yeah, I'm definitely w/ boobs on this one. Wasn't going to say anything 'cause its not the forum nor probably the audience, but, that.

Dismissing something for being pretentious is meaningless.
 
 

 
Jun.19.2013 @ 10:05 AM
ToneHead
I'm not familiar with DFW, but I'll have to check his books out at some point. Whenever he's mentioned, I see this polarized love/hate response, which is usually a sign of something interesting ...
 
 

 
Jun.19.2013 @ 1:21 PM
rexlapin
Re DFW,
Thanks boobs!
I hadn't read him before, but just picked up a copy of "Everything and More" at the library and I'm really enjoying it. My copy doesn't have the forward by Neal Stephenson but I feel like he is able to connect to my non-math savvy brain in a way the makes things clear. Hell of a thing at almost 60 years old!
 
 

 
Jun.24.2013 @ 9:15 AM
J
Considering the wage inequalities of today, I feel a charity based support system for the "good things in life" is especially dangerous. Art is a powerful social force and if the mega wealthy are the ones funding it, the message that they present is the one that gets heard. It's no coincidence that popular music is in praise of a conspicuous consumption based life style.

England with it's lenient welfare system produces more good music consistently than the states. How many great bands are made up of "lazy" art school drop outs, people using "chemical endurance" to manage two jobs at once and/or leeching assholes? Point being, art is a job. We pay people that make terrible food, have poor customer service, are self serving bureaucrats, bad doctors, poor teachers, people that poison the environment and advertise junk food to kids, but making art, even mediocre dross, that, you need to rely on the kindness of strangers!

When electronic mostly analog gear was mistakenly undervalued and got into the hands of more people, we got some awesome music.

If your work has populist appeal, like Thomas Kincade, you'll make money eventually. Arts councils staffed by people with taste that look for people worth fund is not a bad thing.

If you're a musician, writer, or just an artist, it's what you'll do regardless of money or popularity.

It's a nifty trick that some artists have pulled off with Kickstarter, I'm not mad at that. They get money and people get to feel good for being a personal supporter rather than a "consumer".

If you value what you do, why treat it as a charity? I donate money to volunteer organizations, but I know that's crap, they should be funded. Personally, I owe myself (and others) millions of dollars in back pay for the work I do.
 
 

 
Jun.27.2013 @ 9:47 PM
Chris Randall
I think Jonah wins this round.

-CR
 
 

 
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